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Amnesty International vote yes to decriminalisation!

“Sex workers are one of the most marginalized groups in the world who in most instances face constant risk of discrimination, violence and abuse. Our global movement paved the way for adopting a policy for the protection of the human rights of sex workers which will help shape Amnesty International’s future work on this important issue,” said Salil Shetty, Secretary General of Amnesty International.

The resolution recommends that Amnesty International develop a policy that supports the full decriminalization of all aspects of consensual sex work. The policy will also call on states to ensure that sex workers enjoy full and equal legal protection from exploitation, trafficking and violence.”

https://www.amnesty.org/en/latest/news/2015/08/global-movement-votes-to-adopt-policy-to-protect-human-rights-of-sex-workers/

 

 


‘Trafficking Representations’ Call for Papers, Anti-Trafficking Review Thematic Issue

The Anti-Trafficking Review calls for papers for a themed issue entitled ‘Trafficking Representations.’ The deadline for submissions is 8 January 2016.

Work that migrants do in the sex industry and other irregular employment sectors is increasingly characterised as exploitation and trafficking. Representations of trafficking and forced labour are pervasive within media, policymaking, and humanitarian debates, discourses and interventions.

The Review promotes a human rights based approach to anti-trafficking, exploring anti-trafficking in a broader context including gender analyses and intersections with labour and migrant rights.

For more information http://bit.ly/1QrhZqt


10 reasons to decriminalise sex work

The Open Society Foundation works to build vibrant and tolerant democracies whose governments are accountable and open to the participation of all people.

Sex work is criminalised not only through prohibitions on selling sexual services, but also through laws that prohibit the solicitation of sex, living off the earnings of sex work, brothel-keeping, or the purchase of sexual services. By reducing the freedom of sex workers to negotiate condom use with clients, organize for fair treatment, and publicly advocate for their rights, criminalisation and aggressive policing have been shown to increase sex workers’ vulnerability to violence, extortion, and health risks.

This document provides ten reasons why decriminalising sex work is the best policy for promoting health and human rights of sex workers, their families, and communities. Removing criminal prosecution of sex work goes hand-in-hand with recognising sex work as work and protecting the rights of sex workers through workplace health and safety standards. Decriminalising sex work means sex workers are more likely to live without stigma, social exclusion, and fear of violence.

For more information http://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/10-reasons-decriminalize-sex-work-20150410_0-1