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Hepatitis A B C

Hepatitis is a general term for inflammation of the liver, usually caused by a virus.

Symptoms

  • Often there are no symptoms, however, Hepatitis can be detected by a blood test
  • Sometimes there are flu like symptoms
  • Tiredness
  • Sometimes you may have jaundice (yellowing skin and whites of the eyes) and urine can be dark

Hepatitis can take months to recover from and in some cases cause serious liver disease.

Treatment:

  • There are several different combination therapies available for Hepatitis C.

Transmission

 

Hepatitis A

  • Is transmitted through faecal-oral transmission e.g. via food preparation when you haven’t washed your hands after you’ve gone to the toilet.
  • Those engaging in anal sex, oral sex and rimming are at a greater risk.

This is only a brief overview and should not substitute for professional medical advice. The Melbourne Sexual Health Centre has information about Hepatitis A here:
http://www.mshc.org.au/Portals/_default/uploads/fact_sheets/hepA_a4.pdf

Hepatitis B

May be transmitted through semen, vaginal fluids, faeces, saliva and blood.

This is only a brief overview and should not substitute for professional medical advice. The Melbourne Sexual Health Centre has information about Hepatitis B here:

http://www.mshc.org.au/Portals/_default/uploads/fact_sheets/hepB_a4.pdf

Hepatitis C

Is transmitted through direct blood to blood contact. However, there is a small risk of sexual transmission.

This is only a brief overview and should not substitute for professional medical advice. The Melbourne Sexual Health Centre has information about Hepatitis C here:
http://www.mshc.org.au/Portals/_default/uploads/fact_sheets/hepC_a4.pdf

Prevention

  • Using condoms and dental dams
  • Not sharing injecting drug equipment
  • Regular sexual health checks
  • You can be vaccinated against Hep A – this vaccination is not free.
  • Vaccinations for Hep B are free through your nearest Sexual Health Clinic.
  • Hep C is blood borne and you need to ensure that you are well informed of all the risks. Blood tests should be taken every six months if you are at-risk.

 

Note:

This is only a brief overview and should not substitute for professional medical advice.

 

For more information phone RhED 1800 458 752 or email sexworker@sexworker.org.au